Twelve Year Old Bullyied and Called Racial Slurs…But Hey, It’s Socialization!

Bullying 12 Year Old
“So what about socialization?” Most homeschool parents cringe hearing that question and this is an example of the reason why. Those asking the question treat socialization as if it is a one way Yellow Brick Road leading to the Wizard who grants them favor and popularity for the rest of their lives. However, it is far from this scenario. Socialization is a two-way street with positive AND negative stops. What we encounter on the road determines how we often feel about the destination. Try this test. Ask your friends if they are going to their high school reunion? It is not uncommon to hear, “I hated school and the people there so I’d never go back” or something to that effect.
 
This story helps demonstrates one of those major stops along the road, and that is bullying. For Black children, adding in the racial element inflicts scars that are even longer lasting.
 
Homeschool parents are not trying to protect their kids from socialization with others. We are just trying to make sure they only visit the cities of negativity, instead of buying property and settling in for twelve plus years. As Black folks know more than anyone, sometimes you never know how your neighborhood is going to turn out and by the time you want to move as well, it is often too late.

‘I’ve Been Hit, Chased, Thrown Down And Called The N-Word’: 12-Year-Old Speaks Out Against Racism, Bullying

ROCKLIN (CBS13) — A 12-year-old Rocklin boy is speaking out on issues of bullying and racism at his elementary school, CBS13 reports.

Daniel Pocklington addressed the Rocklin school board Wednesday night after his family says a number of incidents were not handled appropriately.

“I want there to be a policy where there’s no hate speech and bullying at Rocklin schools; it’s not fair,” he said.

Daniel bravely took to the podium Wednesday night begging the school board to listen.

“I’m here to talk about what it’s like to be an African American boy in your school. I’ve been hit, chased, thrown down, and called the N-word several times this year.”

cbs131 I’ve Been Hit, Chased, Thrown Down And Called The N Word: 12 Year Old Speaks Out Against Racism, Bullying

“It’s hard for me to find a safe way to go to school and actually feel important. It keeps happening and I don’t feel safe, or that it will get better,” he said.

Daniel was adopted at birth and now at 12, he’s a fifth-grader at Rock Creek Elementary. His family says he gets good grades, is part of student council and on the school’s cross country track team. But his school life has been tough.

“Someone just left a note on my desk again with the N-word. And it makes me think, why does this keep happening to me, like what have I done to people to make them do this to me?” said Daniel.

He says on a number of occasions he’s been bullied, thrown down, kicked and called racial slurs.

“It felt really bad, it felt like you got shot right through the heart. It felt like you didn’t mean anything in the world,” he said.

“He said ‘This is what life is gonna be for me, Mom, and I can’t accept that,’” said Daniel’s mother Adrien Pocklington.

Pocklington says she’s tried speaking with the district and the school’s principal.

“He said he was handling it, that they were doing one-day in-school suspension and I said ‘that’s not enough, that’s not teaching my child that he matters and that the school isn’t gonna tolerate it,’” said Pocklington.

Daniel says he speaking up because it hurts more to hold it in and he knows there are other students feeling the same way but too afraid to speak up.

“I feel like my friends deserve a better way to go to school and feel safe,” he said.

And that strength earned him a standing ovation Wednesday night at the school board meeting.

“They’re not being held accountable, if your punishment isn’t working, change your punishment. If we don’t start now they’re not gonna have the confidence or strength to stand up for themselves,” said Daniels mother.

The Rocklin school district released this statement:

We are aware of instances regarding offensive behavior at one of our elementary schools. Each allegation was addressed immediately with an investigation and appropriate disciplinary actions taken when appropriate. Following the final instance, the principal met that day with all 5th grade students to speak seriously about a variety of related topics including tolerance and acceptance. The Rocklin Unified School District is a place where we build people up and celebrate each other, and embrace our diversity. We will continue to work together with all our families, students and staff to reach that aim.

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Our World History Book for 2016: When We Ruled by Robin Walker – Part One

First of all, let me thank one of our followers on Facebook over in the U.K. for the recommendation to review When We Ruled by Robin Walker. I certainly hope to hear more from them as they have some great insight on homeschooling in another country!

Now, how many textbooks have you had during your school career that really changed your life? Let me tell you, When We Ruled has the power to not only change your kid’s life, but your life as well as the reader and teacher. As a college graduate, I know more about Greek Mythology, European History, non-African languages, overall more about so many other groups than my own! If knowledge was an identity test, I honestly could not call myself an African-American. But Robin Walker’s work is definitely upping my knowledge game.

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So far, this book is a true textbook with over 700-pages of not just text, but photos, maps, and notes as well. When I found out that he also put together a  When We Ruled Study Guide and Reading Plan, that put the icing on the cake and makes it a must have in the curriculum of a homeschooled child. Dare I say any homeschooled child, regardless of ethnicity? If science has admitted that all life originated from Africa, then why would this work be excluded? Sadly, because it is about Africa (and not fitting into the usual narrative of spear-chucking and half-naked people) and has a so-called Black author, I’m sure it would be dismissed by many and that is a sad shame.

As you can see below, the study guide assigns a certain number of pages each day along with Test Yourself Questions, to bring out the main points of each chapter. I love how Walker uses study techniques like re-reading a chapter, having students study the picture and the caption, and will even ask a question forcing the reader to understand how certain positions stand or get refuted in modern history.

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Now this is just part one of a series of posts we plan to do on When We Ruled. I have discovered quite a few different ways to apply the historical lessons from this book into bible and science as well. Therefore, the knowledge gets applied and reinforced, you know, the same way it is in traditional school when you learn that the Greeks and the Romans perfected language,  knowledge, teaching, philosophy, medicine, fitness, the heavenly bodies, the days of the week, religion, and the list goes on and on!

But Robin Walker forces us to ask, “was what I learned in school correct?”

And that brings me to my last point. I have read some that question the history that Robin Walker outlines. Of course, I think all things should be tested and if false, rejected regardless of the source. However, much of the criticism that I have read thus far are similar to other arguments that I have heard made about African history which basically say, “there is no way African people could have been that smart”.

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In The Roots of Nubian Christianity Uncovered, Salim Faraji speaks of the scholarly work done in the early 1900’s that debunked the narrative about Africa and the people and the racism they faced as other scholars would not accept their views (so much for the Ivory Tower being so liberal right?) William Leo Hansberry was the first academician in the United States to teach courses on African history in the 1920s, but was told by one of his mentors that, “I do not believe that Negroes founded these great civilizations. You are a brilliant student Hansberry, but you are a product of our civilization”. (The Roots of Nubian Christianity Uncovered, pg. 25)

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William Leo Hansberry – Photo source: Blackpast.org

My point? All of our lives we have been taught to never question what the Dominant Society tells us about ourselves, no matter how racist their worldview, but we will doubt knowledge from those who have no ax to grind. Or put another way, why do we always think someone else’s ice is colder?

If you are interested in any of the books mentioned in this article, click on any of the images below.

                   

The College Writing Series: How to Pick Great Evidence For Your Essays

A few weeks ago, I started the first true series of Teach Them Right, called The College Writing Series. My first post for the series gave a very brief overview of the format I will be using (CEA – Claim, Evidence, Analysis), and what to expect in future posts.

Now on my second post of this series, I would like to touch on the first step of writing a college-level essay in CEA format, picking evidence for your paragraph. By picking your evidence before doing anything else, you are able to form your argument based off of the evidence instead of picking evidence that fits your argument.

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Can You Really Afford To Homeschool, Or Can You NOT Afford To Homeschool?

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Over the last 12+ years that my wife and I have homeschooled, we’ve heard quite a few reasons why people do not homeschool that say they would like to do so. I have found that after asking questions and working through solutions to their barriers of entry, affordability is hardly ever the real issue. Let us look at the commonly held belief that you have to make “good money”, in order to be able to homeschool your children.

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7 Rules to Writing in College

As the summer starts to wind down and supermarkets start their “Back to School” sales, that can only mean one thing… the start of a new school year.

Maybe you have a high schooler that you’re going to homeschool, and you’d like to prepare them for college. One of the biggest things that I had to learn is that high school writing is not the same as college writing. Usually, freshmen get slapped in the face because the same essays that were earning “A’s” in high school start to be labelled as “not really there yet” in college.

Here are a few rules that you can start using in your teaching to help your student prepare for college:

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Standardized Testing: Pros and Cons

One question that most homeschoolers face is whether or not to test their student. Standardized testing can have its benefits and its drawbacks, but the decision is often based on the learning style of the student. For some students, taking a test can determine where the knowledge of the student is and therefore help to focus on weaknesses later on. For other students, however, taking a standardized test will not capture their whole knowledge, such as those with dyslexia.

So here are the pros and cons to standardized testing, based on my own experiences. I’ll let you be the judge on what the right decision is, whether or not to homeschool.

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Exercise Your Flexibility And Stretch For Freedom

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Summer is half way over and perhaps you are still in the investigative phase as you contemplate whether to homeschool or not. In the future, we will discuss the challenges and discussions that often go on between parents, but today, let me ask you to be rather introspective.

Are YOU really ready to homeschool your child?

Is YOUR life set up to teach your child?

Sorry, today, I have no interest in talking about whether you think your kid can handle it or whether your school system will allow you to bring your child home. I want you to sit back and really think about whether you really want to make this commitment.

Exercise is a part of my life and no matter when, where and how much I have worked over the last 20 years, I made time to exercise. That meant training at 4am, 5pm (which is absolutely the worst time to train in any gym) and 11pm. It was a priority for me and to not exercise was far worst than whatever less than optimal conditions I had to train in.

This is the kind of commitment I want you to make with homeschooling your kids. If you have done so, let’s begin working on some strategies to get you ready for the 2016-2107 school term.

First, start with exercising your freedom at work.

Continue reading “Exercise Your Flexibility And Stretch For Freedom”

Is it Time for Education Reform?

Take a second to think about how the school system works:

1. You step into school at a certain time every day, Monday through Friday.

2. You sit at desks with dozens of other students, learning the same thing, and taking the same notes.

3. Later on, you all take the same test, regurgitating what you “learned”.

4. Everything that you now know is based on the thoughts of the teacher and school board.

Wait, wait… don’t colleges and the workforce say that they want unique individuals? What students do in school is regurgitating what they took notes on, without actually analyzing what they’re supposed to know. What does this sound like?

An assembly line.

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Think It Takes a Genius to Enter College Early? Think Again. Three Easy Steps to Succeed in College

 

In my first post, I told you guys my background and how I was homeschooled up until the tenth grade, when I was able to enter this program called the Early College Alliance. If you read my post, you’d know that the program allowed me to earn 32 free college credits. No, this wasn’t dual-enrollment. I was at the university itself, taking real college classes, with real college students. In fact, if I hadn’t told them that I was 15, they would’ve seen me as a normal college student (when I actually did tell them, and they became aware that I was saving thousands upon thousands of dollars while they weren’t, the look on their face was pretty funny).

So, what am I here to talk about this time?

Simple. What does it take to be successful in college? Do you have a student who’s looking to get into college early, like I did? Here are three simple steps to being successful in college, no matter the age/grade level.

Continue reading “Think It Takes a Genius to Enter College Early? Think Again. Three Easy Steps to Succeed in College”

Three Perks of Being a Homeschooler

Kids in school do not really think about the perks of being a homeschooler, but there are many. Those I’m listing are directed at kids, but some could be toward adults also. One perk I never had the pleasure of getting is quiet siblings. However, these other perks are ones that I did experience.

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