Bible Characters Who Have Used Robert Greene's 3rd Law of Power

One of Joshua’s favorite books is Robert Greene’s 48 Laws of Power. The book is one of mine as well, as I have three of Robert Greene’s books in our “vast family library” (a name I give to all of the books we have in our house that have insight into most of our family conversations and questions).

Therefore, I thought of a fun presentation where he would look at one of his favorite laws, and then find people that seemed to use that law in the Bible. After all, the 48 Laws of Power is really a collection of historical stories, with no particular moral judgement, that describe what people have done throughout history to gain power over another individual or country.

So enjoy what he has found and you may be asking, “What is the 3rd Law?”

Well here you go from: https://48-laws-of-power.blogspot.com/2008/09/law-of-power-3-conceal-your-intentions.html

Law of Power 3: Conceal Your Intentions

“It will be infinitely easier for your enemies to thwart your plans when they know what you’re up to. So plant fake clues, cover your scent with red herrings, hide your motives with false sincerity and you will have them exactly where you want them to be and in the end achieve your goals.”

“The third law of power discusses the various ways on how you can conceal your intentions. one way is by sending mixed signals; confuse your enemies or your target/s with decoys or by being ambiguous and unpredictable. Do the things they’d least expect you to do and when they think they’ve got you figured out, do something unexpected and contrary to what they think you are or up to. This was the advice of the infamous courtesan Ninon de Lanclos to a young marquis who was pursuing a beautiful countess. Bysending mixed, ambiguous signals instead of outrightly confessing his love would the marquis catch the countess’ interest. All went well for the young nobleman until he violated Lanclos’ instructions and revealed his true feelings to the countess right away. the countess then lost all interest in him and even felt used and embarrassed.”

TTR Analysis: The Kerner Report Viewed Through the Paradigm of the Nine Areas of Human Activity

TTR Analysis of the Kerner Report in the Nine Areas of Human Activity by 15 year old Joshua.

His homeschooling assignment was to analyze the Kerner Report in the Nine Areas of Human Activity, which as readers know, is the main paradigm of my entire curriculum. So much more can be said about this interesting report put together at the end of the so-called Civil Rights Era, and I plan to do just that, with a narrated version.

Did you ever learn about the Kerner Report in school or home? The report is not revolutionary in thought in any real way. But what it does show from a macro level, is that the United States has always known its racial problems, and how to solve at least some of them with the Black community. Obviously, they knew what policies would even cause these problems, but more on that in future reports.

In my opinion, the reason why the Kerner Commission Report is interesting is because in my Gen-X lifetime, I’ve seen the “L.A. Riot”, “Ferguson Riot” and “Baltimore Riot”, and each time the nation conducts roundtables, reconciliation prayer meetings and worst of all, media reports/discussions all asking, “How can something like this happen and what can be done to make sure it doesn’t happen again?”

The Kerner Commission explored why these uprisings happened in the 1960s and how to prevent more uprisings in the nation’s cities in the future. It is striking to see my son answer the question, “Was the report effective?” His response, and the statistics he discovered, indicate that he believes he will see many more uprisings in his lifetime as well.

In these upcoming years, hopefully he will not be a whiny voice exclaiming, “Why?”, or “How could this happen?” Instead, he will be able to offer solutions to those who really desire to change and stay on code towards the real solution to our country’s “race problems”.

Please “Like” and hit “Subscribe” for more homeschooling content, lesson ideas, and TTR Analysis for your own research and learning!

Cool Pappa

Do Hugs Belong In The Courtroom?

On Sept. 6, 2018, Amber Guyger shot Botham Jean. She thought Jean was an intruder in her home. Botham Jean was sitting on his couch eating vanilla ice cream and watching TV when Dallas police officer Amber Guyger mistakenly walked into his apartment.

The shooting sparked outrage across the country, many calling it another sad example of a white police officer killing an unarmed black man. Defense attorneys have said, “There is no evidence to suggest the shooting was racially motivated”, says WFAA, an ABC television station licensed to Dallas, Texas, as they reported on the Amber Guyger story.

Key Points In The Killing

According to WFAA news, there are several things that look different in and out side of the apartment. There was a bright red doormat outside Jean’s apartment and his apartment was the only one with such a noticeable doormat. Jean’s apartment was not as neat as Guyger’s. Jean’s TV, which was on when he was shot, was much larger than Guyger’s. Guyger entered in as Jean hadn’t locked his door when he returned home from running an errand.

Should We Forgive Guyger?

There are different opinions on what Guyger did, but some key people forgave her, namely Brandt Jean who was Botham Jean’s brother.  He said he forgave her and wishes her the best. During the sentencing hearing, Jean’s brother Brandt testified that he forgave Guyger and asked the judge if he could get down to hug Guyger according to CNN who also reported on the case. Judge Tammy Kemp gave Guyger a Bible and a hug while in the courtroom, after Guyger was sentenced to 10 years in prison, “a sentence many have called inadequate” says CNN.

Justice or Forgiveness?

Guyger got forgiveness and justice, but would that always be the case? Not forgiving someone can hurt your life, but does that mean you should not receive justice for what was done to you? Living in a world with only justice and no forgiveness is not good, but living in a world with only forgiveness and no justice is also not good. We need a perfect balance of the two but only God can provide perfect balance. That balance will be achieved in a person’s life or at their judgement. God forgives his people, as justice is still required, but God’s wrath was satisfied through Jesus on the cross.  Those who do not have salvation in Christ will still get justice on judgment day, as God gives them exactly what they deserve.

Proverbs 24:12

12  If you say, “Behold, we did not know this,” does not he who weighs the heart perceive it? Does not he who keeps watch over your soul know it, and will he not repay man according to his work?

Revelation 20: 11-15

Then I saw a great white throne and him who was seated on it. From his presence oearth and sky fled away, and pno place was found for them. 12 And I saw the dead, great and small, standing before the throne, and qbooks were opened. Then another book was opened, which is rthe book of life. And sthe dead were judged by what was written in the books, taccording to what they had done. 13 And the sea gave up the dead who were in it, uDeath and Hades gave up the dead who were in them, and they were judged, each one of them, taccording to what they had done. 14 Then uDeath and Hades vwere thrown into the lake of fire. This is wthe second death, the lake of fire. 15 And if anyone’s name was not found written in the book of life, xhe was thrown into the lake of fire.

Acts 17:31

“because He has fixed a day in which He will judge the world in righteousness through a Man whom He has appointed, having furnished proof to all men by raising Him from the dead.”

Written by 13 year old Sierra, contributor for Teach Them Right.

Galatians Quick Study – TTR Analysis

For the Bible study portion of my curriculum, I have my kids perform a book by book analysis. I tend to follow an expository style in our family Bible studies, and want them to do the same and not focus on just popular topics. Sadly, most churches tend to stay topical in their content and most Christians never really learn what the Bible truly says. Therefore, many still feel Adam and Eve bit the apple, Jonah was swallowed by the whale, and “God helps those who helps themselves.”

Our journey originally started with the shortest books of the bible. Each week, the kids would study a different book. When they let me know it was just too much for them to tackle in one week, we moved to two weeks, which is where we currently are at the moment. Asking them to build a presentation is just another way to reinforce what they have learned and see connections with other books they have already studied. As a side benefit, numerous Sunday’s they have actually added to what the sermon was about in church with what they have studied themselves.

The last thing I want to raise are warriors that leave their brains in the car when they walk inside the church. We are to always be thinking critically about what anyone in the pulpit (or anywhere for that matter) is saying.

“Now these Jews were more noble than those in Thessalonica; they received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so.” – Acts 17:11

“…but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect,…” – 1 Peter 3:15

Enjoy this short presentation on the book of GALATIANS created by fifteen year old Joshua.

1 Thessalonians Quick Study – TTR Analysis

For the Bible study portion of my curriculum, I have my kids perform a book by book analysis. I tend to follow an expository style in our family Bible studies, and want them to do the same and not focus on just popular topics. Sadly, most churches tend to stay topical in their content and most Christians never really learn what the Bible truly says. Therefore, many still feel Adam and Eve bit the apple, Jonah was swallowed by the whale, and “God helps those who helps themselves.”

Our journey originally started with the shortest books of the bible. Each week, the kids would study a different book. When they let me know it was just too much for them to tackle in one week, we moved to two weeks, which is where we currently are at the moment. Asking them to build a presentation is just another way to reinforce what they have learned and see connections with other books they have already studied. As a side benefit, numerous Sunday’s they have actually added to what the sermon was about in church with what they have studied themselves.

The last thing I want to raise are warriors that leave their brains in the car when they walk inside the church. We are to always be thinking critically about what anyone in the pulpit (or anywhere for that matter) is saying.

“Now these Jews were more noble than those in Thessalonica; they received the word with all eagerness, examining the Scriptures daily to see if these things were so.” – Acts 17:11

“…but in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect,…” – 1 Peter 3:15

Enjoy this short presentation on the book of 1 Thessalonians created by fifteen year old Joshua. I am encouraging them to take more risks with their own thoughts that are often floated at the dinner table. However, I think once I started telling them the vids would be placed on Youtube, they started becoming a bit more hesitant!

Cool Pappa

TTR Video: The Negro Act of 1740

My Big Homie, who is 15, put together a slide show presentation from his research on the Negro Act of 1740. Feel free to take this 5 minute trip through history and pass on to others that could use the knowledge.

Stay tuned for more vids from The Tribe, as Daddy-Teacher is quite behind on editing and grading their projects, but “I’m still learning” myself!

 

 

Black Veterans: The Epitome of American Patriotism

I want to give a big thank you this Veterans Day to every Black man and woman that served in the United States military. It is ironic that patriotism and racism go together like baseball and hot dogs in the good old USA, as those who scream the loudest saying, “Support our troops!”, often care little about the domestic polices and de facto racism that keeps their “heroes” from living the very American dream that they are told to fight for and export to nations around the world.

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The Black soldier lined up to fight the British in 1775, even while they were being enslaved! To add insult to injury, many of the Black soldiers fought in the so-called Revolutionary War “in place of their masters, fighting for a freedom they would never see for themselves. (In many cases, their enlistment bonuses or even their pay went straight to their masters.)

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At the time of the Civil War, Fredrick Douglass argued that the Black soldier could help the North win the war, but Abraham Lincoln did not want armed Black slaves (and you were taught in school that he wanted to free the slaves right?). He later gave in, but imagine the horrific torture that awaited a Black Union soldier that was captured by the Confederate army? The Black soldier did not receive equal pay for his fighting, and heroes like Robert Smalls proved that the Black soldier really was as smart as the White soldier, which was a common stereotype of the time as well as today (e.g. “IQ tests”). These Black soldiers would soon be placed back into second-class citizenship in the U.S., as the Union and Confederate states sought reconciliation with one another, not the men and women that it had enslaved for over 250 years. Those same Black soldiers, like other formerly enslaved Black Americans, didn’t receive their ”40 acres and a mule”. That land was given back to the very people they had just fought against just years prior.

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Fast forward to WWI, right in the midst of the Nadir period for civil rights, as Black Americans were “free” but certainly not equal, so many Black men enlisted to fight, “the War Department had to stop accepting black volunteers because the quotas for African Americans were filled.” “African American men who owned their own farms and had families were often drafted before single white employees of large planters. Although comprising just ten percent of the entire United States population, blacks supplied thirteen percent of inductees.”  They returned to a nation who’s cities erupted with race riots that stole black wealth (Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1921) and lynchings and sundown towns.

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By WWII, Black Americans still enlisted and desired to fight so-call fascism with pride. However, how embarrassing was it for the USA to be called out on its hypocrisy by none other than…Hitler. He noted that the USA’s treatment of the Negro set an example for how Germany must deal with “foreign Jews”. They returned home after WWII still subjected to Jim Crow segregation, more race riots, and once again, unequal pay, as 1.2 million soldiers were not able to take advantage of their GI Bill and be free to move into the newly formed suburbs which would soon create an even wider wealth gap through housing that remains firmly entrenched into the 21st century. The result, the Black soldier’s family could not benefit from sacrifice that he made for his country not just with housing, but because they were also unable to use the money for college tuitions or business loans. To add insult to atrocity, many were attacked by Whites as they were on their way home from the war.

 

How much changed by the Vietnam War for the Black soldier? I think you know the answer, as the 1960s are the one period of time most American’s did learn about in school as the “Civil Rights Era”, due to the assignation of Dr. Martin Luther King. Black Vietnam veterans, as after every other war, returned to segregated communities and “their place” in society. However, this time, the situation was in the process of changing. Some of these veterans returned home determined to now make this country live up to the promise it had been making to prior Black veterans for generations.

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How will we look at the time of service for those who served in Desert Storm or the so-called Iraqi War and years of fighting the “War on Terror”? Fifty years from now, will we look back and note their time of service at the time when Black men and women were being shot and killed by police officers and the officers continuously get found “not guilty”? Will we see that they served at a time when “White Extremists” in their own country, are considered more dangerous than the terrorist they were fighting in the Middle East?

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In my opinion, the Black veteran is the epitome of an American patriot. Perhaps they have never fought for what America actually was to them, but for what America always promised it would be to them and their offspring for their service.

For that, I sincerely say, thank you for your service.

Cool Pappa

Blaming The Victim: Why It May Be Time To Stop Calling People An “Uncle Tom” And Give Them A New Name

Recently, I’ve been reading The Revolt Of The Black Athlete, by Dr. Harry Edwards. Early

in the first chapter, the term “Uncle Tom” was used often, which got me thinking. Do

people know the history of the term “Uncle Tom” and do they know why it should not be

used in the first place? So, in the following, I will be answering these questions and be

replacing “Uncle Tom” with another term that I suggest should be used.

 

The Origins of Uncle Tom

The origins of “Uncle Tom” comes from the anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin; or, Life

Among the Lowly (usually shortened to Uncle Tom’s Cabin). The novel is about Uncle Tom

and the characters around him, starting with Uncle Tom, a Black man enslaved on a farm

owned Arthur Shelby. Author faced the threat of losing his farm, so he and his wife,

Emily, decided to sell Tom and another slave, Harry, to a slave trader. Harry’s mother,

Eliza, who was Emily’s maid, overheard Arthur and Emily talking about selling Harry

and Tom. So she escaped with Harry before they could sell her son. Tom on the other

hand, was sold to the slave trader, much to the dislike of Arthur’s son, George, who will

show up in the

story later on. Tom is put on a riverboat and is traveling down the Mississippi River

when he saves a little white girl from drowning. The little girl, Evangeline St. Clare, who,

in my opinion, is the white savior in the story, convinces her father, Augustine, to buy

Tom from the slave trader. After two years with the St. Clares, Evangeline (or Eva) dies

from an illness, and her father vows to free Tom. Instead, he ends up being sold by

Augustine’s wife after he was stabbed outside a tavern. Tom is sold to a man named

Simon Legree, the main antagonist in the story. Simon Legree begins to hate Tom when

he refuses to whip his fellow slave. Legree beats Tom and sets his goal on crushing Tom’s

faith in God, but Tom keeps reading the Bible and comforting the other slaves. But after a

while on the plantation, Tom begins to question his faith in God, until he has two visions,

one of Jesus and the other of Evangeline, which resolves his faith in God. After this, he

encourages two slaves to escape, in which they do. Legree demands Tom tells him where

they went, but Tom doesn’t say anything. Therefore, Legree orders that his overseers,

Quimbo and Sambo, who went from slaves to overseers by betraying other slaves,

whip Tom to death. They both repent after seeing Tom’s character while he was dying.

Shortly before Tom dies, George Shelby, the son of Arthur Shelby earlier in the story,

comes to the plantation to free Tom but finds out it’s too late.

Why Shouldn’t the term “Uncle Tom” Be Used Anymore?

 

The characteristics of a so-called “Uncle Tom” does not match up with the one in the

story. Uncle Tom did not betray his race, instead, he did two main things that are against

what a so-called “Uncle Tom” would do. One: he refused to denounce something he

believed in, which was God, even while the white man was beating him, Second, he

unlike Quimbo and Sambo, refused to snitch on runaway slaves. So instead of using the

term “Uncle Tom” to describe someone who may be so-called “selling out their race”,

Sambo is a more accurate term. Sambo, like his counterpart, Quimbo, went from being a

slave to a Black overseer by betraying slaves. The term “Sambo” originally was used

for people that were mixed with Black and Native American ancestry, but then became a

term used for anyone that has Black and white ancestry. In the story Sambo was a part of

the wrongdoing committed by Legree. So when a Black person defends the wrongdoing of

a white person, the person is not an Uncle Tom, but actually a Sambo.

 

In my opinion, the term “Uncle Tom” should not be used any longer, and perhaps Dr.

Harry Edwards, and many other writers, use the term to convey the message

about someone who betrays or speaks out against, fellow Black people. I think the term

should be replaced with “Sambo”, a more accurate term. Some, if not most, have been

misinformed about the origins of “Uncle Tom”, and I hope we can be more accurate in our

terminology in the future when we discuss Black people who are considered to be

betrayers of other Black people, or who defend the unjust actions done to Black people by

other so-called racial groups.

Presentation Outline: The Evolution of Blackface

Lexi had the opportunity to present to her college class this week and decided to talk about the Evolution of Blackface. Perfect timing, as we had just watched Spike Lee’s Bamboozled a few weeks prior, but this was going to be a particularly “interesting” topic before a majority white classroom. 

She has allowed me to repost her presentation outline (so it does not read like an essay) here on our site. Actually, that is the whole point that I’m teaching her, it is HER work! We write so many papers and do so much research for teachers or our employers, but it is our work, and something in us that we should share for our own purposes and not the benefit of others. 

I must also say CONGRATULATIONS to my girl. In one month, she graduates with her Associate’s degree right after clocking the odometer over to her 18th birthday.  Since she’s is going to be an English guru, hopefully she can edit dad’s sloppy grammar here on the site (and get him to write more) as well. 

 

Topic: The Evolution of Blackface

Specific Purpose: To Inform my COM 206 class on the evaluation of blackface.

Central Idea: Everyone believes that blackface ended in the 1980’s, but there are still many examples of its presence online and in the news. From its racial beginning, controversial middle, and still foreseeable future.

INTRODUCTION

Attention-getter: Lisa R. Pruitt looked at her 1985 yearbook she edited when she was an undergraduate at the University of Arkansas. She was looking to see if any of the students appeared in blackface. After everything that has been starting to surface from other people’s college years, Pruitt believed she would find some photos depicting the same thing. After some searching, she was surprised to see that there weren’t any, but wouldn’t be surprised if she would have some.

Relevance to audience: The controversy about blackface has been spreading in the news lately, and this issue is one that is important to understand. Not only to judge future politicians and clothing, but to understand history as a whole.

Preview of speech: So, I will give a quick overview of how blackface came to be, what was happening with college students in the 80s, and how it’s being used in the 21st century.

(Let’s first start with the quick history.)

BODY

  1. The history of blackface is a very controversial and hidden history.
    1. According to Eric Lott from the book Love & Theft: Blackface Minstrelsy and the American Working Class writes that the minstrel show is a, “transparently racial curiosity, a form of leisure that, in inventing and ridiculing the slow-witted but irrepressible ‘plantation darky’”.
      1. Eric Lott continues to say that this was a way of conveniently rationalizing the oppression of black people.
      2. Movies like The Birth of a Nation is an example of blackface. In which white people put on blackface and then made black people look savage and animal like.
    2. The use of blackface dates back to minstrel shows in the mid-19th century
      1. Minstrel shows were the biggest form of entertainment in America before TV shows and movies. These shows often depicted falsehoods about black people to make them seem idiotic and stupid.
    3. After the 1980’s, blackface started to lose its value and instead was being ridiculed. Attitudes started to change about how African Americans are being depicted and whether or not it was right.

(Now that we know some history, let’s jump to the 80s. Where blackface flared until it died, our so we thought.)

  1. For blackface, the 1980’s had many white college students taking part in the practice. This is referred to as the “Great College-Yearbook Reckoning”, stated by Zipporah Osei in “The ‘Great College-Yearbook Reckoning’: Scholars Say Blackface Images Aren’t Outliers”.
    1. Lisa Pruitt also said, “that back then, she and her white classmates weren’t sensitized to the overt racism of blackface”.
    2. This article continues to explain how politicians wore blackface to parties and events during their college years.
      1. Hafsa Quraishi for NPR writes, “both the (Virginia) governor and the attorney general admitted to instances of dressing in blackface for parties in the 1980s”.
      2. Zipporah Osei continues to say that, “Mark Herring, Virginia’s Democratic attorney general, admitted that he too had donned blackface in the 1980s”.

(Now after this time period of college rebellion, we enter the 21st century. This is when we start to see another rise of blackface, but in a different form.)

  • There are still images of blackface being created today in the 21st century. What’s to say that it will end any time soon.
    1. The NPR article says that, “Back in 2000, when comedian Jimmy Kimmel was the host of The Man Show, he had a recurring skit in which he wore blackface to impersonate former Utah Jazz basketball player Karl Malone”.
      1. In this skit, he would mock Malone’s speech and intelligence while wearing full-body blackface.
        1. Jimmy Fallon also wore black face while portraying comedian Chris Rock in an episode of Saturday Night Live in 2000.
      2. This was being talked about so much that Spike Lee, a famous black director, made a movie called Bamboozled that was released in 2000.
        1. This movie touched on the reality of what would happen if minstrel shows were brought back today in the form of a television show. Not only did it talk about blackface, but it also touched on how black people can sell each the out.
      3. The Italian brand Gucci just got ridiculed for selling a black turtle necked sweater that included a red-lined cut out for costumers’ mouth.
        1. Other brands that had similar racist moments include Burberry with a hoodie that had a noose around it, and H&M with its ad controversy of a black boy wear a shirt that said, “coolest monkey in the jungle”.

CONCLUSION

Summary Statement: To conclude, blackface is still very much alive and well. Even though we think that no one uses blackface anymore; brands still release clothing that are blatantly racist. Famous comedians today also have put on blackface, yet they seem to be surprisingly quite during this blackface controversy toward the Virginia governor.

Audience Response Statement: Staying on top of this situation is important to understand how your century thinks. Will you still feel the same way you did when you shopped at Gucci before the sweater outrage, or will you know feel disgusted to own their products?

WOW Statement: We can’t get to a world of no racism, it is virtually impossible. But things as blatant as Gucci’s sweater can be resolved with a little common sense and understanding of history.

TTR Lesson of the Day: Analyzing Black TV Fathers

Black TV Dads collage

Today’s Lesson: Tuesday is Black TV Dad Tuesday. So today, the kids take notes comparing episodes of Good Times (James Evans), Bill Cosby Show (Heathcliff Huxtable) Fresh Prince of Bel Air (Uncle Phil), and Everybody Hates Chris (Julius). They are analyzing the role the Black father has inside the home. How is he portrayed? How is he different than Dre on Blackish (one of the few Black dads currently on TV)? What is his role in the family? Does he fit or promote stereotypes the dominant society has about Black men?

I will be sure to share what the young superstars come up with here!

Cool Pappa